Learning Spanish Words from a “Novela” (Soap Opera)

Learning Spanish Words from a "Novela"Learning Spanish Words from a “Novela”: did it ever happen to ypu? Almost every night, I watch a “novela” (soap opera) here in Colombia called “El Estilista.”

Although “El Estilista” literally means “The Stylist,”  it is a a “novela” inspired by a true story by people who were kidnapped by “El FARC”.

According to Wikipedia.org, “El FARC” means R”evolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia”.

It is a military organization involved in the continuing Colombian armed conflict since 1964. FARC claims to be an army of peasant Marxist-Leninists. They have a political platform of agrarianism and anti-imperialism.

The operations of the FARC are funded by kidnapping for ransom, illegal mining, extortion and the production and distribution of illegal drugs.”

When I watched “El Estilista” a couple of nights ago, I thought it would be a good idea to jot down some vocabulary words that I hear used on “El Estilista,” and then share them with you. Here are 6:

1. Secuestro – kidnapping

El secuestro duró siete años.
The kidnapping lasted seven years.

2. Secuestrador/a – kidnapper

El secuestrador exigió dos millones de pesos por liberar a su víctima.
The Kidnapper demanded two million pesos in exchange for releasing his victim.

3. Rescate – ransom

Los secuestradores pedían un rescate de dos millones por la hija.
Kidnappers demanded a ransom of two million for the daughter.

Learning Spanish Words from a “Novela”: War & Revolution

4. Metralleta – machine gun

Los ladrones entraron al banco armados con metralletas.
The robbers entered the bank armed with machine guns.

5. Fusilar – To execute with a firearm

Fusilaron a los secuestrados cerca del muro del cementerio.
They executed the kidnapped (victims) near the cemetery wall.

6. Revolucionario – revolutionary

Los revolucionarios ganaron nuevamente el control de la ciudad.
Revolutionaries regained control of the city.

Learn More Spanish Idioms Here!

This Spanish lesson about some common Spanish phrases is courtesy of  Patrick Jackson – LearningSpanishLikeCrazy